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English Courses and Descriptions

English 9
English  9,  an  integrated  English  course  based  on  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English/Language  Arts  in   Grades  9-­‐10,  is  a  study  of  language,  literature,  composition,  and  oral  communication,  focusing  on  literature  within   an  appropriate  level  of  complexity  for  this  grade  band.  Students  use  literary  interpretation,  analysis,  comparisons,   and  evaluation  to  read  and  respond  to  representative  works  of  historical  or  cultural  significance  in  classic  and   contemporary  literature  balanced  with  nonfiction.  Students  write,  responses  to  literature,  expository   (informative),  narrative,  and  argumentative/persuasive  compositions,  and  sustained  research  assignments.,    .   Students  deliver  grade-­‐appropriate  oral  presentations  with  attention  to  audience  and  purpose  and  access,   analyze,  and  evaluate  online  information.  Grade 9.

English 9 Honors

English 9H is a year-long course for freshmen who are prepared for a more rigorous approach to language arts. Just as in English 9, the course focuses on all aspects of language arts. Students read both literary and informational texts, and they complete a variety of writing activities. In addition, students gain speaking experience through discussion and presentations. The significant difference between English 9H and English 9 is the rigor of the course.

English 10
English  10,  an  integrated  English  course  based  on  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English/Language  Arts  in   Grades  9-­‐  10,  is  a  study  of  language,  literature,  composition,  and  oral  communication,  focusing  on  literature  with   an  appropriate  level  of  complexity  for  this  grade  band.      Students  use  literary  interpretation,  analysis,   comparisons,  and  evaluation  to  read  and  respond  to  representative  works  of  historical  or  cultural  significance  in   classic  and  contemporary  literature  balanced  with  nonfiction.  Students  write  responses  to  literature,  expository   (informative)  and  argumentative/persuasive  compositions,  and  sustained  research  assignments.    .  Students   deliver  grade-­‐appropriate  oral  presentations  with  attention  to  audience  and  purpose  and  access,  analyze,  and   evaluate  online  information.

English 10 Honors, CC (LITR 100)
English 10H is a year-long course for sophomores who are prepared for a more rigorous approach to language arts. Just as in English 10, the course focuses on all aspects of language arts. Students read both literary and informational texts, and they complete a variety of writing activities. In addition, students gain speaking experience through discussion and presentations. The significant difference between English 10H and English 10 is the rigor of the course.

English 11
English  11,  an  integrated  English  course  based  on  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English/Language  Arts  in   Grades  11-­‐12,  is  a  study  of  language,  literature,  composition,  and  oral  communication  focusing  on  literature  with   an  appropriate  level  of  complexity  for  this  grade  band.    Students  use  literary  interpretation,  analysis,  comparisons,   and  evaluation  to  read  and  respond  to  representative  works  of  historical  or  cultural  significance  appropriate  in   classic  and  contemporary  literature  balanced  with  nonfiction.  Students  write  narratives,  responses  to  literature,   academic  essays  (e.g.  analytical,  persuasive,  expository,  summary),  and  more  sustained  research  assignments   incorporating  visual  information  in  the  form  of  pictures,  graphs,  charts  and  tables.  Students  write  and  deliver   grade-­‐appropriate  multimedia  presentations  and  access,  analyze,  and  evaluate  online  information.

English 11 Honors, CC (LITR 222/223)
English 11H is a year-long course for juniors who are prepared for a more rigorous approach to language arts. Just as in English 11, the course focuses on all aspects of language arts. Students read both literary and informational texts, and they complete a variety of writing activities. In addition, students gain speaking experience through discussion and presentations. The significant difference between English 11H and English 11 is the rigor of the course.
English 11H is also part of Lincoln’s Early College curriculum and follows a Vincennes University course syllabus throughout the year. If students meet enrollment criteria, they may earn credit for Literature 222, a VU course, during the first semester and Literature 223, also a VU course, during the second semester. The two VU courses are American Literature courses.

Advanced Composition
Advanced  Composition,  a  course  based  on  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English/Language  Arts,  is  a  study   and  application  of  the  rhetorical  writing  strategies  of  exposition  and  persuasion.    Students  write  expository   critiques  of  nonfiction  selections,  literary  criticism  of  fiction  selections,  persuasive  compositions,  and  research   reports.  Grade 12.

World Literature
World  Literature,  a  course  based  on  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English/Language  Arts,  is  a  study  of   ancient  and  modern  representative  works  by  major  authors  from  six  continents:  Africa,  Asia,  Australia,  Europe,   North  America,  and  South  America.  Students  examine  a  wide  variety  of  literary  genres  and  themes.    Students   analyze  how  the  ideas  and  concepts  presented  in  the  works  are  both  interconnected  and  reflective  of  the  cultures   and  historical  periods  of  the  countries  represented  by  the  authors.  Grade 12.

AP English Literature and Composition, CC (ENGL 101/102)
AP  English  Literature  and  Composition  is  a  course  based  on  the  content  established  and  copyrighted  by  the  College  Board.    The  course  engages  students  in  the  close  reading  and  critical  analysis  of   imaginative  literature  to  deepen  their  understanding  of  the  ways  writers  use  language  to  provide  both  meaning  and  pleasure.      As   they  read,  students  consider  a  work's  structure,  style,  and  themes,  as  well  as  its  use  of  figurative  language,  imagery,  symbolism,  and   tone.    Writing  assignments  include  expository,  analytical,  and  argumentative  essays  that  require  students  to  analyze  and  interpret   literary  works.  Grade 12. 

Advanced English, CC (LITR 100)
Advanced English, College Credit, is an advanced course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in grades 11 and 12.  This course title covers any English language and composition advanced course offered for credit by an accredited postsecondary institution through an adjunct agreement with a secondary school.  Grades 11 and 12. 


Creative Writing, CC (ENGL 202)
Creative  Writing,  a  course  based  on  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English/Language  Arts,  is  a  study  and   application  of  the  rhetorical  writing  strategies  for  prose  and  poetry.  Using  the  writing  process,  students   demonstrate  a  command  of  vocabulary,  the  nuances  of  language  and  vocabulary,  English  language  conventions,   an  awareness  of  the  audience,  the  purposes  for  writing,  and  the  style  of  their  own  writing.  CREATIVE  WRITING   PROJECT:  Students  complete  a  project,  such  as  a  short  story,  a  narrative  or  epic  poem,  a  persuasive  speech  or   letter,  a  book  review,  a  script  or  short  play,  or  other  creative  compositions,  which  demonstrates  knowledge,   application,  and  writing  progress  in  the  Creative  Writing  course  content.    

Classical Literature

Classical  Literature,  a  course  based  on  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English/Language  Arts,  is  a  study  of   Greek  and  Roman  Empire  literature  by  the  major  authors,  such  as  Aristotle,  Cicero,  Dante,  Euripides,  Homer,  Ovid,   Plato,  Plutarch,  Sappho,  Sophocles,  St.  Augustine,  Virgil,  and  others.  Students  examine  a  variety  of  literary  genres,   such  as  tragedy,  comedy,  epic,  lyric,  novel,  oratory,  and  others.  Students  analyze  themes  as  they  relate  to  the   transition  from  oral  to  literate  cultures,  the  emergence  of  cities  and  empires,  the  use  of  mythology,  and  the  rise   and  fall  of  democracy.  Students  analyze  how  classical  literary  patterns,  themes,  and  conventions  have  influenced   modern  literature.  

Film Literature

Film  Literature,  a  course  based  on  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English/Language  Arts,  is  a  study  of  how   literature  is  adapted  for  film  or  media  and  includes  role  playing  as  film  directors  for  selected  screen  scenes.  Students   read  about  the  history  of  film,  the  reflection  or  influence  of  film  on  the  culture,  and  issues  of  interpretation,   production  and  adaptation.  Students  examine  the  visual  interpretation  of  literary  techniques  and  auditory  language  in   film  and  the  limitations  or  special  capacities  of  film  versus  text  to  present  a  literary  work.  Students  analyze  how  films   portray  the  human  condition  and  the  roles  of  men  and  women  and  the  various  ethnic  or  cultural  minorities  in  the  past   and  present.  FILM  LITERATURE  PROJECT:    Students  complete  a  project,  such  as  doing  an  historical  timeline  and   bibliography  on  the  development  of  film  or  the  creation  of  a  short-­‐  subject  film,  which  demonstrates  knowledge,   application,  and  progress  in  the  Film  Literature  course  content.    

Language Lab

Language  Arts  Lab  is  a  supplemental  course  that  provides  students  with  individualized  or  small  group  instruction  
designed  to  support  success  in  completing  course  work  aligned  with  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English   Language/Arts  focusing  on  the  writing  standards.  All  students  should  be  concurrently  enrolled  in  an  English   course  in  which  class  work  will  address  all  of  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards.

Mythology
Mythology is for those students who desire or need further information about material, which is most frequently used in allusions. This course will emphasize the ancient myths, early gods and goddess, and vocabulary, which would come from those studies. 1 credit.

Novels
Novels,  a  course  based  on  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English/Language  Arts,  is  a  study  of  the  distinct   features  of  the  novel,  such  as  narrative  and  fictional  elements  of  setting,  conflict,  climax,  and  resolution,  and  may   be  organized  by  historical  periods,  themes,  or  authors.    Students  examine  novels  of  a  given  period,  such  as   Victorian,  the  Modern  Period,  or  Contemporary  Literature,  and  what  distinguishes  novels  from  short  stories,   epics,  romances,  biographies,  science  fiction,  and  others.  Students  analyze  novels  by  various  important  authors   from  the  past  and  present  or  sets  of  novels  from  a  specific  era  or  across  several  eras.

Shakespeare
Shakespeare begins with short unit on the poetry of Shakespeare and continues with an in-depth reading and discussion of a number of Shakespearean plays. Students will also write paragraphs and essays pertaining to what they read. An attempt will be made to avoid plays usually covered in other literature classes. 1 credit.

Speech, CC (COMM 143)
Speech,  a  course  based  on  the  Indiana  Academic  Standards  for  English/Language  Arts,  is  the  study  and  application   of  the  basic  principles  and  techniques  of  effective  oral  communication.  Students  deliver  focused  and  coherent   speeches  that  convey  clear  messages,  using  gestures,  tone,  and  vocabulary  appropriate  to  the  audience  and   purpose.    Students  deliver  different  types  of  oral  and  multi-­‐media  presentations,  including  viewpoint, instructional,  demonstration,  informative,  persuasive,  and  impromptu.    Students  use  the  same  standard  English   conventions  for  oral  speech  that  they  use  in  their  writing.

Student Media, Newspaper

Student  Media,  a  course  based  on  the  High  School  Journalism  Standards  and  the  Student  Media  Standards,  is  the   continuation  of  the  study  of  journalism.  Students  demonstrate  their  ability  to  do  journalistic  writing  and  design   for  high  school  media,  including  school  newspapers  and  yearbooks,  and  a  variety  of  other  media  formats.   Students  follow  the  ethical  principles  and  legal  boundaries  that  guide  scholastic  journalism.  Students  express   themselves  publicly  with  meaning  and  clarity  for  the  purpose  of  informing,  entertaining,  or  persuading.  Students   work  on  high  school  media  staffs  so  that  they  may  prepare  themselves  for  career  paths  in  journalism,   communications,  writing,  or  related  fields.

Student Media, Yearbook

Student  Media,  a  course  based  on  the  High  School  Journalism  Standards  and  the  Student  Media  Standards,  is  the   continuation  of  the  study  of  journalism.  Students  demonstrate  their  ability  to  do  journalistic  writing  and  design   for  high  school  media,  including  school  newspapers  and  yearbooks,  and  a  variety  of  other  media  formats.   Students  follow  the  ethical  principles  and  legal  boundaries  that  guide  scholastic  journalism.  Students  express   themselves  publicly  with  meaning  and  clarity  for  the  purpose  of  informing,  entertaining,  or  persuading.  Students   work  on  high  school  media  staffs  so  that  they  may  prepare  themselves  for  career  paths  in  journalism,   communications,  writing,  or  related  fields.

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